Rodborough Pike

The road junction around the Prince Albert, a busy meeting and passing point, was previously referred to as Rodborough Pike.

Opposite the Prince Albert was a small cottage in the grounds of Pike House. It has been altered but there appears to have been a toll window in the front.

The pike was a central venue for special occasions

 

At Whitsuntide both the Parish Church and Rodborough Tabernacle would have parades.

Irene Connor born in 1917 and speaking in 2009 remembered…

“Every Sunday morning all the children would be going out and going to their Sunday school and when it was Whitsuntide and it was the processions they would meet …you know, with a band and process all the way up the hill and sing a hymn and what have you.  It was really a big family day then.”

The Prince Albert before enlargement in the early 20th century
That policeman would be risking his life there today!

The shop on the corner of Butterrow West in its heyday

George Evans born in the 1930s, recalled…

“Every Tuesday Lyons ice cream van used to deliver the ice cream to the Post Office on the corner of Rodborough Hill and I remember waiting there for it to come in. Without a cornet was a penny and if you had a cornet it was tuppence.”

 

The Post Office and Shop demolished 1960s.
How handy to be able to shop locally!

There had also been a shop adjoining the Prince Albert on Rodborough Hill, where Mrs Cook sold sweets. Sadly, we have no photos.

In the early 1900s Rodborough Post Office was on The Butts.

Many of the former buildings at Rodborough Pike have been demolished for road improvements.

Its hard to believe that this house stood on corner of Butterrow West – now occupied by a bench seat and plant pots.

Looking along Butterrow West to the Prince Albert