A

Adams William Henry

Aldridge Charles Hayel

Stroud News 28/5/1915 Rodborough men in the Forces

Aldridge Maurice

Stroud News 28/5/1915 Rodborough men in the Forces

Allard RE

Stroud News 19/11/1915 Enlisted. Reserve. Rodborough

Apperley J Dennis

Stroud News 7/7/1916 – Of Frome Park Rd. Grouped up

Stroud News 4/8/1916 – Training with the Royal Berkshire Rgt not far from Portsmouth, so it is a prospect of the brothers meeting occasionally… Chief cashier and secretary of Messrs Townsend & Co of Stratford Mills. Popular entertainer, member of Conservative Club, arranged the programme and acted as accompanist.

Stroud News 1/9/1916 – Writing to his friend Mr Harry Nicholls of Bath Rd, Mr Dennis Apperley of the Berks is in characteristically happy vein. He addresses his ‘dear friend and neighbour’ from Portsmouth and his communication is one of the cheeriest of the many cheery soldiers letters it has been my pleasure to receive.

Stroud Journal 17/01/1919 – Others of the demobilised include Dennis Apperley, already busy back at Messrs. Townsend & Co’s.

Apperley Harold

Stroud News 7/7/1916, Artificer in the Navy

Apperley Hollis

Stroud News 13/10/1916 – Hollis Apperley ERA RN had the pleasure of meeting his brother Dennis of the Royal Berks during the weekend. They both looked as fit as fiddles and are doing well in the sister services.

Apperley James

Serving with 5th Glos Rgt. (Stroud and The Great War, published by Stroud News 1920)

Attended Kingscourt School (Log books Gloucestershire Archives)

Artus Owen Leslie

Axford Francis Albert

Stroud News 15/9/1916 – Military Tribunals. Age 39. Married cowman and milk seller was appealed for by his employer, Frederick Thomas James of St Ringers Farm, Rodborough who said further withdrawal of labour from the farm would seriously affect its productiveness. He had lost 3 young men and his only son was in active service at the front with the Yeomanry. There was 20 cows in milk  and the farm was 80 acres in extent, including 10 acres arable. There were 3 other men on the farm, but this was the only one who knew anything about cows or the milk business.

Lieut Wood said they could not afford to lose a man like this. Taking the average of farms in the country, there was more labour on this farm than on most farms of its acreage. The appeal was refused.

In 1911 census lived at Hawarden Cottage, The Butts

Ayers family

It was stated that Mr & Mrs Ayers (James R & Annie) of Butterrow had six sons serving in the army

(Stroud and The Great War, published by Stroud News 1920)

Press report says 10 boys. 1911 census 11 children

Lived at The Laurels Butterrow

Ayers Arthur

4th Hussars

Ayers Alfred John (Jack)

9th Worcs Rgt

Stroud News 3/11/1916 – Bob & Monty Ayers sons of Mr & Mrs Ayers of Butterrow have written to their brother Jack who was brought back from the trenches to work on munitions on which  he was employed before war broke out. They are both in the pink of condition though somewhat weary, a very natural position

Ayers Albert Thomas (Bert)

Stroud News 30/6/1916 – Attested but retained at his civilian work for a few months. One brother not yet in uniform.

Dept manager woollen goods

Stroud Journal 03/01/1919 – Has been hospital with an injured knee, sustained while playing football in France. Now moved from Boulogne to Glasgow.

Stroud Journal 10/01/1919 – Though sorry that Bert Ayers should have been so badly incapacitated with his knee, yet we are glad to see that this real sport is now back in Blighty, and we trust his stay here now will be a permanency. But why on earth send a man who lives in the South to a hospital in Glasgow. It seems absolute pig-headedness on the part of the authorities.

Stroud Journal 04/04/1919 – Bert Ayers lately demobilised from the army & still limping..Bert and his many brothers, we cannot be quite sure of their number, are a truly fortunate lot, in so far as they are one of the few families who have come through this war without the loss of one of them. And this is not because they have had soft snips, or been existing on home service or at the base. Each one of themhas been up the line nearly all the timein the front line fighting units in the trenches

Ayers Robert George (Bob)

Stroud News 30/6/1916 – Home from France where has been since Oct last. In 49th Canadian division. Emigrated to Canada 5-6 yrs ago. Farming. One of 5 soldier sons of Mr & Mrs Ayers of Butterrow, who also have 2 sons-in-law serving.

Stroud Journal 04/04/1919 – Marriages: March 20th (1919) at Stroud Parish Church(by special license) Robert George Ayers, 49th Canadians, fifth son of James Richard Ayers & Mrs Ayers, he Laurels, Butterrow, Nr Stroud, to myrtle Trixie Tessible, second daughter of George & Olivia Osborne of Osborne House, Tower Hill, Stroud.

Stroud News 3/11/1916 – Bob & Monty Ayers sons of Mr & Mrs Ayers of Butterrow have written to their brother Jack who was brought back from the trenches to work on munitions on which  he was employed before war broke out. They are both in the pink of condition though somewhat weary, a very natural position.

Ayers Harry

No military references yet found

Ayers Frederick

No military references yet found

Ayers Montague Thomas (Monty)

10th Royal Fusiliers. Sergeant.

Stroud News 3/11/1916 – Bob & Monty Ayers sons of Mr & Mrs Ayers of Butterrow have written to their brother Jack who was brought back from the trenches to work on munitions on which  he was employed before war broke out. They are both in the pink of condition though somewhat weary, a very natural position.

Stroud News 5/1/1917 – Monty Ayers Corporal Royal Fusiliers, home on sick leave. Has been in France for about18 months.Previously engaged in engineering with Messrs Waller & Co of the Pheonix Ironworks at the Thrupp.

Ayers Walter Charles

Postman. Wounded in the lungs. Died 1st Jan 1925, leaving widow and baby

Stroud News 10/11/1916 ‘With the Colours’ – I was pleased to welcome Mr Water Ayers, stationed at Plymouth, one of several soldier sons of Mr & Mrs Ayers of the Butterrow, Stroud. He has been in the army for five months and this is his first leave: he might have come home some months ago, but when relief was convenient he was unable to take advantage of it because he was in training in Ireland. Walter is a fine specimen of a gritty soldier and in the Royal Garrison Artillery he cannot fail to be of great value. Through the examination as a signaller – telegraphist and telephonist.  – he came out with honours and is very keen on his work. Of course the experience he gained while employed at the Stroud General Post Office, served him in good stead. He now sports the crossed flags and the laurel wreath with the letter T inset. Three or four of his brothers – I am not sure of the number – are on active service, two in France. The Ayers brothers are good fighters. Walter Ayers was grieved to learn of the passing of his Post Office colleague Walter Jones. He will get to rub shoulders with Maurice Halliday who went to Bristol on Friday and has been attached to the RGA at Plymouth.